Updating resume

Since you’ll want to be swapping different information in and out depending on the job you’re applying to, keep a resume master list on your computer where you keep any information you’ve ever included on a resume: old positions, bullet points tailored for different applications, special projects that only sometimes make sense to include.

Then, when you’re crafting each resume, it’s just a matter of cutting and pasting relevant information together. In marketing speak, “above the fold” refers to what you see on the front half of a folded newspaper (or, in the digital age, before you scroll down on a website), but basically it’s your first impression of a document.

Make your resume easy on hiring managers’ eyes by using a font size between 10 and 12 and leaving a healthy amount of white space on the page.

You can use a different font or typeface for your name, your resume headers, and the companies for which you’ve worked, but keep it simple and keep it consistent.

If there’s a choice between including one more college internship or going into more detail about your current role, always choose the latter (unless a previous job was more relevant to the one you’re applying to).

Yes, creative resumes—like infographics, videos, or presentations—or resumes with icons or graphics set you apart, but you should use them thoughtfully.

As a rule, you should only show the most recent 10-15 years of your career history and only include the experience relevant to the positions to which you are applying.

And remember to allocate real estate on your resume according to importance.

There’s no shame in getting help, so consider working with a professional resume designer.

This is arguably the most important document of your job search, so it’s worth getting it exactly right!

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